Andy in the Cloud

From BBC Basic to Force.com and beyond…


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Branch Support for GitHub Salesforce Deploy Tool

If your not familiar, the GitHub Salesforce Deploy Tool will allow you to place a handy button on your GitHub README files to allow for super easy browser based deployment from your repo to a Salesforce org. Up until now it only worked on the master branch, it now supports branches!

GitHubSFDeployBranches.png

The new support for branches, does in fact cover tags and commits as well. Though only branches are defaulted from the button. If you already have the button on your README file, you will find it now magically starts detecting the branch!

ButtonOnABranch.png

Deploy to Salesforce buttons on branches now work!

If your new to the tool, go to the main page and grab the button code and paste it into your README file.  Or if you want a button you can use explicitly in a blog or article you can fill in the fields and generate it from the same page. As you can see the enhancement adds a new ref parameter to the generated URL. This can be a branch name, tag or commit. You can read more about the tool here.

ButtonWithScript.png

Enjoy!

 


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GitHub Salesforce Deploy Tool Lightning Edition

A recent discussion on Twitter around sharing Salesforce configuration between admins has motivated me to revisit this tool. Before getting into anything major (watch this space). I decided to get back into the tools code by addressing a few outstanding maintenance tasks, enhancements and bug fixes, as well as treating it to a face lift!

LightningGitHubSFDeploy.png

As some of you may have noticed the tool has now adopted the Salesforce Lightning Design System look and feel. This new version is not just cosmetic, its also addressed some key enhancements and bug fixes…

LightningGitHubSFDeploy2.png

In keeping with the Lightning principles, this release makes the Deploy to Salesforce button (example shown below), even easier to place in your repository README files with less configuration required. The button will now automatically detect the GitHub repository. Which is useful if you Fork a repository into your own account or rename it, you no longer need to change the README file. The button code is now also smaller.

LightningGitHubSFDeployButton.png

IMPORTANT NOTE: This only works if your placing the button code in a GitHub README file. If your planning on using the button on a blog, article or wiki etc tick Use Specified Owner and Repository checkbox to have the specified repository details encoded into the button code as before.

This release has now also addressed issues preventing use with repositories that have Reports or Lightning Components in them. So you can now use the tool to deploy your favourite open source Lightning Components!

Finally if you have any private repositories, an improvement around the error handling in this area has also been made. Thanks to some great code contributions from Moti Korets and  Nathan Kramer for the whole GitHub private repository support! Thanks guys!