Andy in the Cloud

From BBC Basic to Force.com and beyond…


4 Comments

Apex UML Canvas Tool : Dreamforce Release!

Screen Shot 2013-10-14 at 22.16.58

Update: Dreamforce is over for another year! Thanks to everyone who supported me and came along to the session. Salesforce have now uploaded a recording of the session here and can find the slides here.

As those following my blog will know one of the sessions I’ll be running at this years Dreamforce event is around the Tooling API and Canvas technologies. If you’ve not read about what I’m doing check out my previous blog here. I’ve now uploaded the code to the tool I’ve developed that will be show casing these technologies. I’ll be walking through key parts of it in the session, please do feel free to take a look and give me your thoughts ahead or at the session if your attending!

Installing the Tool

You now also install the tool as a managed package into your development org by following these steps.

  1. Install the package using the package install link from the GitHub repo README file.
  2. Installed is a tab which shows a Visualforce page which hosts the externally hosted (on Heroku) Canvas application.
  3. You need to configure access to the Canvas application post installation, you can follow the Salesforce guidelines on screen and/or the ones here.Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 17.52.55
  4. Click the link to configure and edit the “Admin approved users are pre-authorised” option and save.Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 17.53.54
  5. Finally edit your Profile and enable the Connected App (and Tab if needed)Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 17.57.08

Using the Tool

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 17.41.16

  • The tool displays a list of the Apex classes (unmanaged) in your org on the left hand side, tick a class to show it in the canvas.
  • Move the Apex class UML representation around with your mouse, if it or other classes reference each other lines will be drawn automatically.
  • There is some issues with dragging, if you get mixed up, just click the canvas to deselect everything then click what you want.

It is quite basic still, only showing methods, properties and ‘usage’ relationships and really needs some further community push behind it to progress a long line of cool features that could be added. Take a look at the comments and discussion on my last post for some more ideas on this. Look forward to see you all at Dreamforce 2013!


8 Comments

Preview: Demo of Apex Code Analysis using the Tooling API and Canvas

This weekend I’ve been fleshing out the code for my second Dreamforce 2013 session. I’ve been having a lot of fun with various technologies to create the following demo which I’ve shared a short work in progress video below. The JQuery plugin doing the rendering is js-mindmap, it’s got some quirks I’ve discovered so far, but I’m sticky with it for now!

The session highlights the Tooling API via this tool which can be installed directly into your Salesforce environment via the wonderful Salesforce Canvas technology! This is proposed session abstract …

Dreamforce 2013 Session: Apex Code Analysis using the Tooling API and Canvas

The Tooling API provides powerful new ways to manage your code and get further insight into how its structured. This session will teach you how to use the Tooling API and its Symbol Table to analyse your code using an application integrated via Force.com Canvas directly into your Salesforce org — no command line or desktop install required! Join us and take your knowledge of how your Apex code is really structured to the next level!

Technologies involved so far…

I’ve also found the excellent ObjectAid Eclipse plugin (which is sadly a Java source code only tool) to explore the Tooling API data structures in much more detail than the Salesforce documentation currently offers, especially in respect to the SymbolTable structure. I’ll be sharing full code and discussing the following diagram in more detail in my session! In the meantime I’d love to know your thoughts and other ideas around the Tooling API!

Tooling API